Ana- a novel

Sorry for the pixilated nature of this draft of the front cover! The text on the right is a foldover for the front cover-imagine it just inside the book.

 

I’m excited to announce that my novel, Ana, will be out from Silent e Publishing in November! Ana is a fifty-eight-year-old widow living in coastal Central Florida, a transplant from New Jersey. Ana has secrets, and she wants to keep them that way-secret. Widowhood provides the perfect cover.

The format I chose for Ana allows the reader to chose how to read the book; as a light, ladies’ novel, or as a difficult comment on that most difficult aspect of the human condition-relationships. How I did this is, I added an appendix to the book which lets readers get to know characters with a sketch of each one. The story holds together, either way. You pick what you want to know about people, just as you do in real life.

 

Chapter 1

Usually when Ana got to the hospital for her Friday night shift on the ER desk, she was in sneakers and work out pants, and took a quick shower before she changed into her Pink Lady smock and slacks. She hoped nobody would notice her black dress and ballet flats, touch of lipstick; but the nurses, and Charley the security guard, knew her on sight. Since none of the other volunteers worked weekends, somebody would remark on her attire. Sure enough, even though she had a tearful ten-year-old with an ice pack on his wrist and a pair of anxious parents in the triage room, Judee the R.N. on duty called—as Ana scanned her keycard for the door marked EMPLOYEES ONLY—“Looking good tonight, Ana! Out on the town?”

“Just the annual library appreciation dinner.”

“Ana, I swear, you’re the busiest person in town. They ought to give you a key to the city. Not too bad in here tonight. Pretty slow for a Friday.”

Judee turned back to the little boy, Billy Preston. Ana knew him from church. He was the waterboy for the J.V. football team; somebody must have fumbled right into him. Ana let the door close behind her and headed for the locker room. She passed local Art Guild paintings and photographs in the wide hallway. Her favorite was John Clinton’s panoramic photograph of the Confederate oak at Old Fort Park, across from the city marina. A wonder it never sold; she’d been here going on four years and that picture greeted her, day and night, on her way to change.

The locker room was in the old part of the hospital, along with the morgue and the laundry; its door required an old-fashioned key. Ana kept one on her ring and fished it out of her one and only black pocket book; a leather hobo bag Frank brought back from Quebec. She usually left the purse rolled in a towel on the top shelf of her locker. Ana almost never dressed up, and customarily carried a backpack. Before she rewrapped the bag in the towel, Ana took her sneakers, sweat pants, and t-shirt out of it. She put the sneakers on the floor, tossed the clothes in the uniform hamper. Saturdays she washed and ironed all the volunteer smocks anyway, and nobody else was going to be in before she did that. Never hurt to add a few of her own things to a load.  The budget committee was glad to spring for the washer, dryer, iron, and ironing board when Ana proposed she do all the uniforms for the week after her Friday shift.

She sat down on the bed, surplus from when the hospital upgraded, to remove her stockings and flats. The flats fit neatly next to her leather bag; the stockings she stashed in the delicates bag hanging from the locker’s cross bar. Her own uniform smock and slacks hung on a wire hanger and she took them with her into the bathroom to change, even though nobody else was coming in. She preferred to change in private, not take a chance of an embarrassing moment. Above all things, Ana valued privacy.

Ana liked working the weekend third shift, and the staff appreciated it because most volunteers worked days or early evenings, so the paid staff had to screen incomers to the ER themselves at night. Billy had been taken back by the time Ana sat down behind the reception desk. The security guard sat alone in the waiting room, watching Fox News. Ana would probably work until about two in the morning, unless things got very busy. Generally on the weekends there were a few walk-ins, but the more serious cases came in by ambulance, bypassing Ana completely.

There were forms to sort from the morning shift—Peggy Phillips and Roger Ahern had worked together; they always left paperwork on the reception desk. Ana gathered the intake forms, scanned her security card for the double doors to the hallway, and slipped them into the inbox for the insurance department to handle Monday morning. She returned to the waiting room to find a bleeding man in the chair, patiently waiting, next to her desk.

“Hello, I’m Ana. I’m sorry I wasn’t here when you came in. What’s your name?”

“Andy McNamara,” replied the man. He had a dirty white t-shirt pressed to his forehead above his right eye, visible scrapes on both elbows. He looked about sixty: he was deeply tanned, with a white beard and moustache, and the yellowed eyes of an alcoholic.

“Well, Mr. McNamara, if you don’t mind I will just fill out your intake form for you since your hands are full, and you can sign once we get you cleaned up, how’s that?”

Something snapped to attention, a sort of puzzlement crossed his face, when Ana said Mr. He straightened his spine and pushed back into the chair. “Alright,” he said softly.

“Okay, so why don’t we start with what happened.”

“Well, I fell off of my bicycle. I saw the sign for the hospital, I was right down on Dixie Freeway, and walked my bike here to see if I could get fixed up.”

“We’ll get a nurse to take a look at you soon.” Out of the corner of her eye Ana saw Judee studiously ignoring them. She was great with locals—and tourists with insurance—but not so good with drunks and the homeless. Ana, on the other hand, had a talent with downtrodden patients. “What is your age?”

“Forty-seven.”

“Address?”

“Well, ma’am, I’m traveling. I’m just sort of…passing through. I’m originally from Teaneck, New Jersey.”

“We get a lot of visitors here from New York and New Jersey. Particularly this time of year and also in winter, when they like to get away from the cold weather. And do you have any insurance?”

“Well,” his gaze dropped, “I haven’t gotten round to applying down here.”

The security guard gave a loud snort, not taking his eyes from the television, beer-belly bouncing beneath crossed forearms.

“Okay. Don’t worry about that right now. It can be taken care of, retroactively,  after you’re seen. Here’s a worksheet on that; I’ll put it with your paperwork. You can complete it at the local library, because some of it needs to be done online. It just needs to be done within thirty days of being seen here. The library is right down the road, about a quarter mile south of the hospital. Here. You can sign after you get cleaned up; give the hospital copies to the staff back in the ER after that, please, and let me put this bracelet on. Which hand do you write with? Thank you. You can stay right there until the nurse can see you. As you can see, we aren’t very busy at the moment.”

Ana could see Judee and was willing to bet she wasn’t charting anything, but playing solitaire on the computer. She smiled at the patient, got up and carried his paperwork to the triage room. Yep, solitaire. Judee closed it with a deep sigh and shot Ana a conspiratorial, put-upon glance: Don’t you just hate dealing with these people? Ana kept her face carefully neutral. Judee was the professional, after all. Ana was just a volunteer.

“Andy?” Judee called from across the room, not bothering to get up, “In here, please. Let’s get your vital signs.”

At that moment, the automatic doors to the outside slid open and a pack of teens came in escorting a boy wearing dripping wet baggies and a rash guard. Night surfing, no doubt. Ana put on a careful smile and handed one of the kids a clipboard with a blank intake form. It might be an interesting night, after all.

Sample from the appendix:

NOTES 

Page 4.

Usually when Ana Ana (Therill) Mills is 58 years old. She was born in Gainesville, Florida, on October 6th, 1956. She grew up in Flagler Beach, Florida, the fourth of five children. Her mother was an avid reader, volunteer at the local library, and chair of the visitation committee at the First Baptist Church. Ana was baptized on Mother’s Day, 1964. The Therill family attended church on Sunday mornings for Sunday school and worship service, Sunday evening, and Wednesday night for prayer meeting throughout Ana’s childhood.  Her father was Sunday School director and chair of the finance committee. He was from Greenwood, Mississippi, an orphan, and earned a degree in civil engineering from Georgia Tech through the Navy ROTC program. He worked for a surveying company in Jacksonville, Florida, after the Navy, where he met Ana’s mother. When Ana was four years old, he went to work for NASA. Ana didn’t know what he did for a living but she got to watch all the launches at Cape Canaveral from the VIP stands with her mother, brothers, and sisters.

Ana met Frank Mills in drama class their sophomore year in high school. He liked her long blond hair and used to sit behind her and play with it. They married right out of high school; Frank did three years in the Army, then went to work for the Florida East Coast Railroad, and later for Amtrak. He was a station manager, and transferred to New Jersey. Their daughter Ella was born five years later. Ana stayed home with the children. After Frank died, she moved to the town of Robinson, Florida, forty miles south of Flagler Beach.

Sure enough, even Judee Marquetta Golden is 36 years old. She is a single mother, never married, of two teenaged girls. She has been a nurse for five years, having worked nights as a certified nursing assistant at a nursing home to put herself through nursing school. Her fourteen year old daughter is mildly mentally handicapped, and three months pregnant by someone she met at the all-children’s playground. Judee is a Robinson native, born in the hospital she works at. She doesn’t vote or care about politics, but she is deathly afraid of men and of sharks. She doesn’t swim and she doesn’t date.  Her oldest daughter is the result of a gang rape at a frat house party.

Judee turned back Billy Everett Preston 11,  is an honor roll fifth grader at Ponce DeLeon Elementary in Haven Beach. He has a big brother who is on the high school basketball team. Billy has red hair and freckles and his ears stick out. His parents won’t let him wear his hair long enough to cover them, so he wears a baseball cap whenever possible. He sleeps in a baseball cap in hopes that it will move his ears closer to his head. He gets teased at school, called Billy Billy Big Ears. His hero is his big brother, who got him the job as waterboy for the football team. They let him wear a ball cap to all the games. He has a secret crush on a girl in his class named Brooklyn who wears combat boots and long skirts year-round. She is skinny and has and auditory processing deficit, so she never says anything in class and has to sit next to the teacher’s desk.

Her favorite was John (no middle name) Clinton, 68, is a retired astrophysicist from New Mexico who moved to Robinson six years ago. After the desert, Robinson seemed impossibly crowded and close. He bought a good camera and started taking pictures of things which bothered him, like SUV’s and trucks and recyclables in garbage cans. Once he began to feel a part of the town and to accept it, he started taking pictures of flora unfamiliar from his past life in New Mexico. He is particularly fond of photographing live oak trees. He lives with his life-partner in a condo in Haven Beach, a retired army colonel  named Casey Lovett. They enjoy walking the beach at low-tide with a garden trowel and metal detector. The most interesting thing they had found, so far, is a World War Two era Nazi wristwatch inscribed, Hauptmann , Stumm, unter , und tödlich, Ihr Führer.

Page 5.

Ana kept one Frank Marcus Mills (deceased) was born in 1955 in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the middle child of  Lee and Sarah (Clancy) Mills. He was raised Catholic and as the second son expected to go into the priesthood. When his parents moved to the Florida coast, Frank was fourteen. His father was part of a new real estate venture seeking to aggressively convert the small town of Flagler Beach to a wealthy retirement destination for northerners. Frank’s mother’s role was to run a wine and cheese store catering to these clients. The store was only partially successful; the Mills’ hadn’t counted on the tea-totalling nature of the local population. After their children were grown they retired to coastal Maryland, finding the Florida summers increasingly brutal.

Frank fell in love with Ana Therill the first time he saw her, walking down the beach in a brown and white cotton bikini which was too big in the butt and threatened to fall off every time she walked from the dune line to the water. He also fell in love with the ocean and collected soda bottles and mowed lawns to buy his first surfboard. Frank shared a bedroom with his brother, and one evening as they were falling asleep, Montgomery described in horrible detail a sexual encounter he had with a thirteen year old boy, a runaway, in Jacksonville Beach the previous night. Frank punched his brother in the mouth, got dressed and grabbed his wallet, climbed out the bedroom window, took his surfboard from the side of the house and went down to the beach. The next morning, Frank went to a phone booth and made an anonymous call to the department of children and families, reporting what his brother had done. He camped under the boardwalk and the following Monday enlisted in the Army. He never told anyone else what his brother had done, but he also never spoke to Montgomery again.

Frank married Ana and they had two children. He was eleven years short of retirement when he got sick and lost his job with the railroad. He had recently been converted to part-time but never told his wife. His death by Huntington’s ate up all savings and assets which were in his own name.

Page 6.

There were some Margaret Bridgett (McNaulty) Phillips is 67 years old, and had been married at eighteen to her high school sweetheart, Roberto, in Charleston, South Carolina. She worked as an eighth grade science teacher at a private school and he was the custodian there. Both wanted children, but they were unable to have them. When they were sixty two, Roberto and Margaret retired to Robinson. Roberto spent his days fishing in a john boat on the Intracoastal Waterway. Margaret does cross stitch, watches soap operas on television, and volunteers three afternoons a week at the hospital. She fell in love and began a flirtation, what she hoped would turn into an affair, with Roger Ahern, a widower from Monterey, California.

Roger Ryan Ahern 83, is a north California native who worked in the canneries from the time he dropped out of high school at fifteen until he was seventy two years old. He is six foot five, and weighs three hundred four pounds. Powerful as a young man, all his muscle had gone to fat as soon as he left the cannery. Roger is a gregarious octogenarian who likes the ladies and had twin daughters, Breck and Brock, in the Navy. They would both reach retirement in three years and his secret dread was that they would retire to Robinson. He collects postage stamps and spends his free time and his saving studying for and traveling to philatelic conventions and auctions. He is fond of Mrs. Phillips but has no intention of entering into a relationship with her outside of joking around when on duty at the hospital. He volunteers because he swore he would to his dying wife, who passed away at the Robinson hospital of a burst appendix five years ago.

Page 7.

“Andy McNamara,” replied Andrew Elvis MacNamara IV ,47. He served his country as an CIA agent based in Langley, Virginia, for fourteen years, joining the agency immediately after receiving his master’s in psychology from Harvard University at 23 years old. He came from a long line of patriots; both of his parents had been eastern bloc spies during the Cold War. His grandfather was a Navy flyer killed in the raid on Tokyo following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Andy had foregone family life and friendship for service to his country. In an undercover job in 2005, he failed to notice an asset slipping a powerful drug into his drink at a crucial moment; the mistake resulted in the deaths of three agents. Andy lost his job and climbed into a bottle; he eventually was evicted from his apartment and began walking toward Florida, with a vague notion of suicide in Key West as the sun sunk beneath the horizon and the revelers around him cheered. He planned to swim until he sank.

The security guard Terrell Elias Realmuto, 39, works two jobs; as a cop in Port Orange and as security guard at the hospital. He and his wife, Earline, lived with Terrell’s mother in West Robinson. They had two children in college, boys, at Florida State. Both won scholarships for baseball, one was a pitcher, the other a catcher. Terrell worked so much that he only had time for one hobby—he belonged to a hunt club where he hunted wild pigs with nothing but a bowie knife. He went on four hunts a year and bagged a hog every time.  Terrell drank Miller High Life and fell asleep in front of the television on his rare days off.

 

Page 8

At that moment Lynn Thomas Till, 17, had Asperger’s syndrome. The thing he wanted most in the world was friends, so he learned to surf. He read everything he could about surfing and surfers, and sat on the beach and watched for three years before trying it. He had perfect technique, and could not understand why the other surfers his age laughed at him or yelled at him no matter what he did or said.  He had heard some boys he knew from school arguing that nobody was brave enough to night surf in these shark-infested waters, so Lynn said, “I will.” The event was scheduled for Friday night, and all the boys showed up to watch; there was a full moon. Several girls showed up too, which Lynn hadn’t expected. Two of them, the Johnston twins, Jessica and Jenna, begged him not to go out. He got nipped by something after his first ride, close to shore. Jessica and Jenna drove him to the hospital, followed by a jeep full of boys.

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